CSS Box Model Properties – Block-level Elements

This post is part of a CSS Layout course that you can take with us to learn how to create CSS Layouts using HTML and CSS float layout technique. This post will make sense to you the most if you watch the accompanying videos described in the course description at the end of this post. You might still be able to find useful information in this post even if you don’t take the course but that’s primarily not the goal of this post.

If you want to control any aspect of the box model, you need to use the relevant CSS properties. For example, you want to add some border around the content of the box. You write the following line of code in your CSS:

p {
border: 1px solid black;
}

Or you want to add some padding to the top of the box, you write this line of code in your CSS:

p {
padding-top: 10px;
}

You basically have the following keywords in order to control the different aspects of the box model of any box in CSS:

  • width
  • height
  • padding
  • border
  • margin

“width” specifies the width of the content area in case of box-sizing: content-box. In the case of box-sizing: border-box; it controls the width of content area + padding-right + padding-left + border-right + border-left.

“height” specifies the height of the content area in case of box-sizing: content-box. In the case of box-sizing: border-box; it controls the height of content area + padding-top + padding-bottom + border-top + border-bottom.

“padding” specifies the width of the padding around the content area. You can have padding-top, padding-right, padding-bottom and padding-left.

In the case of “border” things get a little complicated since you can have,

  • padding-width
  • padding-style
  • padding-color

Each of these can, in turn, be defined for each of the sides. So you can, for instance, have

  • padding-right-width
  • padding-left-style
  • padding-bottom-color
  • etc.

“margin” defines the width of the margin for the four sides of the box. So you can have

  • margin-top
  • margin-right
  • margin-bottom
  • margin-left

Please note that if you simply write “margin” it’s going to set the margin for the four sides of the box simultaneously. This applies to “padding” and “border” as well. For example, if you write,

p { margin: 10px; }

it would have the same meaning and effect as,

p {
margin-top: 10px;
margin-right; 10px;
margin-bottom: 10px;
margin-left: 10px;
}

As mentioned before, this post is part of the documentation section of a CSS Layout course. In this course, you can learn how to create flexible layouts using the “float” CSS property. You can take this course with us at the following address:

Author: John Raschedian

Web Developer

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